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Wednesday, September 10, 2008

On Headcoverings & Submission

I came across a clip art picture today that is a beautiful example of a medieval snood.

I found this pic on The Graphics Fairy blog http://graphicsfairy.blogspot.com/2008/02/princess-katherine-of-france.html

She says it is a picture of Katherine the Princess of France, from Shakespeare's Henry V. I can't quite tell what the snood is made of. It looks too shiny to be ribbon. Any ideas? I'd like to try and duplicate it, in a much shorter length to suit my thin, fine hair. lol At any rate, it fueled my obsession with all things headcovering-related.

And since I'm on the headcovering topic, I wanted to share an excellent page about biblical submission. For the record, I am a former career-woman trying to supress my independence in Godly submission to my husband. (He makes it easy! ) :) My friends and family think I'm nuts, but I don't think they really understand what biblical submission IS. Maggie, at Frugal Abundance puts it much better than I do. http://www.frugalabundance.com/biblicalsubmission.htm

Now to dig through my yarn stash so I can start another snood!

2 comments:

LisaM said...

This is a lovely picture! The band across the forehead is new to me as well - sort of. It reminds me a little of the Indian style decorative hair jewels worn for special occasions like weddings. The head band across the top could very well be satin, couldn't it? Or perhaps the designer had somehow worked in gold threads to make the material so shiny. However it was done, it is stunning, and would look just as nice without all the shine, I think. Thanks for sharing this! :) Much joy to you with snoods and other such stuff!

Mackenzie said...

The only thing odd about the forehead band is that it seems to stop at the snood rather than being tied the whole way around her head as is commonly seen in paintings from early 15th century Florence.

It also seems like an oddly Victorian drawing to me (the pen-to-mouth just seems wrong for Renaissance portraiture of a woman). I wonder what reprint of Henry V it was from.